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. >> after a decade of deception, lance armstrong admitting his story of success was, in his words, one big lie. it's friday, january 18. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> good morning. i'm john muller in for rob nelson. >> and it is friday. >> friday. we made it. tgif. >> yes. armstrong said he was driven to cheat by a ruthless desire to win, saying it never felt wrong, he never felt bad about what he was doing and still didn't seem to be terribly contrite during that confession with oprah. we'll have the complete confession in a moment. first, a look at some of the other stories we're following. including escape from algeria. five americans held hostage by terrorists. they're now safe. but for others, the danger is not over. a lot of questions as to how many people remain, how many were taken to begin with. so definitely a situation that continues to evolve. >> very fluid situation there. >>> also ahead, changing the meaning of home. the new nontraditional way which homes are growing and families are expanding. >> fascinating. especially for those that are thinking about taki
-reaching doping scandal, lance armstrong is now apologizing. >> why this is a very costly move for armstrong, who has denied for years that he's taken performance enhancing drugs. it's tuesday, january 15. >> from abc news, this is "world news now." >> good tuesday morning, everybody. i'm rob nelson. >> and i'm sunny hostin. paula faris is on assignment. we'll get right to the armstrong apology in just a moment, because really that is, i think, the headline today. >> absolutely. and a complete fall from grace after years of strong, passionate denials to everybody. >> almost belligerent in his denial. >> to everybody, cameras, in court, to his sponsors, his friends. and now the truth has finally come out. >>> also this morning, major developments in the gun control debate. the president may bypass congress to call for reforms, while one state is beating the feds, passing the nation's first gun reform deal since the newtown massacre. >> not the only state to take action. things are starting to unroll a little bit on that issue. >>> later this half hour, an unlikely weapon in the war on obesity. how
off tonight. >> reporter: wearing a sports coat and looking calm, lance armstrong revised history, and admitted to oprah that he used performance enhancing drugs. >> i think the entire interview was difficult. i would say he did not come clean in the manner that i expected. >> reporter: it turns out he really was on more than just his bike. he's been accused of running up a doping bill investigators have pegged at more than $1 million. andy andy tauping officials describe a ghoulish list of medical enhancements -- blood transfusions, up to twice in three weeks during the tour, along with epo, testosterone, cortisone and an extract of calves blood called actovegin. ex-teammate floyd landis described in an abc news exclusive, a cloak and dagger strategy that even involved injecting drugs hidden in the team bus on the side of the road. >> and the blood would be taped on the wall or hung up at a certain level above your head so that gravity caused it to run in your veins and then you leave. >> reporter: landis was attacked by armstrong for his admission and he wasn't alone. armstrong
livestrong staff members, sources tell abc news lance armstrong took responsibility for the damage his actions have caused the livestrong foundation. the cancer charity he founded and which helped turn him from athlete to global icon. it's not just about the drugs, but the defiance, his categorical insistence that he never cheated, now coming back to haunt him. >> i have never doped. >> reporter: you could see it in his unflinching glare. for more than a decade, on tv, to fans, sponsors and cancer survivors. >> the cynics, and the skeptics, i'm sorry for you. i'm sorry you can't dream big. i'm sorry you don't believe in miracles. >> reporter: even under oath -- >> i can't be any clearer that i've never taken drugs. >> reporter: today, sources say armstrong is attempting to apologize by phone to a select few former friends, including ex-teammate floyd landis, who broke his silence to abc news in 2010 and sparked armstrong's downfall. >> i think that the team had become paranoid that the police or somebody was watching the hotel rooms. >> reporter: but can a tell-all with oprah repair th
, one more note tonight. the world will hear lance armstrong's confession to oprah winfrey. but even before the details emerge from that interview, another blow for armstrong today. olympic officials stripped him of the bronze medal he won at the olympic games in sydney, australia, in 2000. >>> and still ahead here on "world news," imagine waking up during surgery, feeling everything, but you can't say a word. tonight, hope for thousands of people, a breakthrough idea to keep it from happening to you. if there was a pill to help protect your eye health as you age... would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes, from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula not found in your multivitamin to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health. [ slap! ] [ slap! slap! slap! slap! ] ow! ow! [ male announcer ] your favorite foods fighting you
. >>> and to the latest on the lance armstrong case. armstrong may be coming clean to oprah, but that's not enough for anti-doping officials. they want the disgraced former champ to fully confess under oath if he wants to return to the sports world. right now, armstrong is banned for life from participating in any olympic competition. >> interesting one there, huh? >> i know. i understand now that oprah is sort of breaking it up into a two-day interview. at first it was just one day. there's so much interest in it. i think what's intriguing to me is that he may be giving up other names because he wants to have less -- i guess he doesn't want this lifetime ban. is he really going to compete at this stage of his life? >> he's 41 years old. i'm wondering what he really imagines what he wants to do. by the way, oprah says he didn't come clean in the manner she expected. she didn't really qualify that. we'll have to see the interview and see what she means. >> who knows? everybody is going to watch. i know i am. >>> we said this before here on "world news now," you never really know what's going to hap
? >> thank you, sam. >> welcome back. >> and josh? >>> we begin with lance armstrong. he's speaking up this morning, ahead now of the big interview with oprah winfrey today. once one of the most revered athletes ever is now expected to admit to blood doping and the use of performance-enhancing drugs. abc's neal karlinsky has followed this story from day one. so, neal, what exactly is neal saying? what are we expecting to hear today? >> reporter: we expect a confession. sources close to armstrong say we can expect to see his human side. they say that he'll speak openly, honestly, and directly with oprah, but likely only offer a limited confession. we know for instance, he has a standing offer on the table with the u.s. anti-doping agency that could reduce his lifetime ban to just about eight years or less even now, if he comes clean and names names. so far, he's not taken them up on that offer. >> so, neal, from the perspective of armstrong's camp, lot of questions about, what is to be gained and lost here? >> reporter: the stakes are huge for armstrong. there are at least three civil s
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7